Sunday, February 15, 2009

CAUCASIAN CALLED "tempe" as a TEMPEH???

I just got know this!!!!
hahahahaha...

erm first let me tell u something...
actually i browsing something about food processing in internet
since my laptop dah ok dr serangan2 virus yg menular ke seluruh
bandannya..

eh back to the story....
my lecture for food science subject giving us an asngment about food processing..
it is base from what ever food that we want to...
my group work choose to make tempe as our asngment......
tempe????
makanan yg sgt jawa!!!
hahahahah...
im javanese....

actually during my process to find the information...
im realize that tempe is very famous!!!!!!
sgt famous!!!!
sampaikan kat tempat mat saleh tu diorg buat tempe ikot makanan ruji
diorg...
some of them mix with sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, and rice.....
see that!!! unbelieveable.....tempe turn to TEMPEH.....
HAHAHAHA....

some of their recipy also had been booked.....

tu la yg aku tau makan jer..
tak tau plak yg mat saleh kenal tempe and they called them as a TEMPEH!!!!!!
AKU RASE MACAM MALU PLAK...
HAHAHAAH...


my friend said just now yg memaang mat saleh called them as A TEMPEH....
such a embrassing moment....heheheh...
tutop muke aku!!!!! nggeeeee~~~~
dalam2 malu bangge la jugak..
yela tempe yg slalu aku makan tersgtlah international upenyer...

tempe ni byak khasiat...
come let me tell u some story about tempe!!!
eh TEMPEH???? AAARRRGGHHHH KONPIOUS!!!!....

HISTORY BOUT THEM

Indonesia - Tempeh processing could be the oldest food technology in the history of Javanese people. Serat Centhini, a book published in the 16th century, indicates that tempeh had been produced and consumed by the time of its publication. Tempeh might have been introduced by the Chinese who are making a similar product, soybean koji, which are dehulled soybeans fermented with Aspergillus molds. The use of Rhizopus as tempeh starter in Indonesia may have been due to its better adaptation to the Indonesian climate. The earliest reference to tempeh by a European appeared in 1875 in a Javanese-Dutch dictionary. The rise of tempeh's popularity in Java and its spread to other parts of Indonesia and other countries of the world began in the 20th century. In the 1970s the banana leaf as container for the production of tempeh was replaced by the use of plastic bags.

Europe - In Europe, tempeh is known through the Dutch who once colonized Indonesia. In 1895 the Dutch microbiologist and chemist Prinsen Geerlings made the first attempt to identify the tempeh mold. The first tempeh companies in Europe were started in the Netherlands by immigrants from Indonesia. The first English written article appeared in 1931 the book "Vegetables of the Dutch East Indies ", written by J.J. Ochse. The earliest popular article about tempeh was a 7 page story published in France 1982 in Le Compas.

USA - In the USA, tempeh has been known only since 1946 with the publication of "Possible Sources of Proteins for Child Feeding in Underdeveloped Countries", in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In the 1960s there was new interest in tempeh with research in tempeh at the Cornell University (New York) and at the USDA Northern Regional Research Center (Illinois). In 1961 Mary Otten was the first to begin making tempeh.
Great deal of the credit for introducing tempeh to the American public goes to The Farm, a large spiritual and farming community in Summertown (Tennessee).
The first commercial tempeh shop was started in 1975 by Mr. Gale Randall in Undadilla, Nebraska. An article by R. Rodale in "Prevention" in June 1977 brought him and his shop national prominence.

Developing countries - In the 1940s Van Veen tried to introduce tempeh in Zimbabwe. But efforts to introduce tempeh as cheap source of protein in Zimbabwe and other developing countries (Africa and South-America) have mainly failed since the local populations have no experience with mold-fermented foods.

Actual trends - In Europe, the USA and other industrialized countries the interest for tempeh is increasing, by growing interest in health, nutrition and vegetarisme.


HEALTH BENEFIT OF SOY BEAN

  1. Decreases symptoms of menopause - The soy isoflavones products appear to decrease the symptoms of menopause, especially hot flushes. More information about isoflavones and menopause.
  2. Reduces risk of certain cancers - Using soy products appears to decrease the risk of breast cancer. Soy products may also decrease the risk of colon and prostate cancer. The anti-cancer action of tempeh is attributed to the isoflavones. The isoflavones have antioxidant properties and help to prevent to oxidation of DNA. Isoflavones also seem to reduce the growth rate of cancer cells.
  3. Rich in healthy soy protein - Soy products are excellent vegetable sources of protein. Most current health recommendations suggest limiting animal protein, so substituting soy for chicken, beef, or pork makes sense. Compared to all other beans, soybeans have the highest amount of protein. In fact, 38% of the soybean's edible weight is soy protein, with the rest coming from carbohydrate and fats. The soy protein contain all the essential amino acids!
  4. Free from saturated fat - Soy products are free of the saturated fat implicated in many health problems. Soy is also cholesterol free.
  5. Builds stronger bones - Isoflavones in soy appear to increase the bone mineral content of post-menopausal women, decreasing the possibility of osteoporosis. More information about isoflavones and osteoporosis. The soy isoflavones are responsible for the bone protection but also, the recplacement of animal protein with vegetable or soy protein improves bone health.
  6. Lowers cholesterol - Soy products appear to lower total blood cholesterol and LDL levels at about the same rate as decreasing fat in the diet. Twenty-five grams of soy protein is thee recommended daily consumption by the FDA. The approved health claim states: 25 grams of soy protein daily, in a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease. Many food products containing soy protein advertise this claim on the label.
  7. Mild for kidney - People with reduced kidney function--such as those with diabetes who have nephropathy--can benefit by replacing animal protein with soy protein.








For the conclusion.....
kalu makan tu rajin2 la tau sikit2 pasal bender yg kite makan...
if ur not u all akan jd mcm aku just tau makan kembang kan perot
n lelemak..
hahahahaha.....



HIDOP TEMPEH!!!!!!




3 comments:

hamizaizuddin said...

huhuhuu..sedapnyer tempe!!..
rindula..ni yang nak mesia ni..

hamizaizuddin said...

huhuhu..sedapnyer tempe!!!..
ni yang nak blik mesia ni..hehe

a.n.i.s ^_^ said...

tempe sambal sgt sedapppbbb!